Where have all the bloggers gone?

Inspired by Where have all the flowers gone? Popular folk song

WANTED: INTERESTING BLOG POSTS ABOUT LIFE AND WRITING

If you’re of a certain age, or ever went to Scout camp, you may already been humming along.

I’m having to sign up to follow and receive via email more and more blogs, because the bloggers I’ve been following for years are publishing fewer and fewer posts, and I need reading material to keep myself centered in the writer-support blogosphere I inhabit.

I write fewer posts because most of my posts have had something to do with the skills I acquired while learning to write – and I’m not actively working on those right now unless I find something I need to learn to get through a current scene.

Because I’m getting to the end of Netherworld – and know exactly where I’m going.

And there aren’t any tricky or new scenes – just the kind of wrapping up I’m hoping will put smiles on readers’ faces, followed by worried frowns about the implications!

I use writers’ blogs to stay up-to-date

I haven’t done marketing in a while (and it shows) because I have two brain cells, and one is needed for breathing, while the other takes an occasional turn at writing a few more words.

But one of these days someone will post something which will trigger something else, and I’ll be off and running.

There are lots of beginner ‘How to’ posts, fewer post on marketing, and almost none on marketing a very small output. At least not successfully.

So I take on new blogs

when I find one which has something a little less basic to say, or is in an area I probably won’t write – hoping to steal the genesis of an idea I can tweak into the book-selling campaign of the century.

I’d appreciate suggestions of blogs to follow, especially if you wouldn’t mind telling me what you like about them.

New platforms may be the problem

I don’t think I’m going to try Instagram or Tik Tok or Book Tok or even Twitter – mostly because I don’t think that’s where my kind of writer finds readers and followers.

Certainly not Youtube – not now! The competition must be fierce.

Trying a Patreon was a waste of time for me (this time) because you have to bring your own followers – and then generate extra material for them. The latter I like – I have lots of words about process and writing – but I don’t have yet the critical mass of followers, and, with very little energy, can’t afford to try.

But a lot of people ARE moving to the new platforms – the young ‘uns don’t use FB much any more.

Where are the readers?

To be more specific for me, where are the readers of mainstream/literary/contemporary fiction, but only those who are not hiding behind the wall of ‘I only read traditionally published and vetted fiction.’

And that, my dear readers, I have not solved yet.

But then I spend most of my time writing lately, and ultimately that will have to yield the answer.

So I try each new blog I find through blogs I already read or people who somehow find me, and participate for a while to see if we are a good fit. There are tens of thousands of my words out there contributing to these fun conversations.

Eventually we will reach critical mass, right?

I’d hate to think the indie experiment is doomed.

**********

Send me your recommended blogs.

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29 thoughts on “Where have all the bloggers gone?

  1. tealveyre

    I’m with you on not wanting to get into social media. I just find twitter and instagram really boring most of the time. Youtube, however, I love making youtube videos. There is a lot of competition and my growth has been super small, but I’m not too worried about growth. I mainly do it for myself, because I enjoy ranting in front of a camera. If you’re looking for a good blog to follow, I recommend Jennifer Mugrage’s Out of Babel if you aren’t already following her.

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    1. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

      Unfortunately, video and I don’t get along (nor do audio – podcasts – and I). Brain’s not up to them. Just give me a transcript and let me skim and I’ll know everything I want to know in a fraction of the time the thing takes.

      Even at a higher speed, they make me itch! It’s not the format but the lack of editing, the ‘ums’, the lack of content, and the lack of ability to get on with it and skip the parts I”m not interested in.

      I know they’re very popular, but I have to sit this trend out.

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  2. acflory

    Are you following Chris The Story Reading Ape? Chris scours articles about writing, both Indie and Trad, and showcases them on his blog. I’ve found some very interesting discussions through those posts. Audrey Driscoll posts quite a few articles on writing related matters. There are more but I can’t think of them off the top of my head.

    Liked by 2 people

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      1. acflory

        Yeah, he ranges far and wide for those nuggets. No idea how he has the time to seek out so many different bits of info about writing, and publishing.
        Like you, I wish there were some easy way to reach the readers who like the same things we do. :/

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

          I think a lot of people send him things. Once you have a reputation as a concentrator, you will get a lot of material. The same way I automatically send most of the funny things that come across my FB feed to a particular group.

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

          Chris is naturally social – and he knows what his followers like to see. I’m way out in left field, as usual, so not as much of it interests me, but many people read his posts daily. And he’s a genuinely nice human being.

          Liked by 1 person

        3. acflory

          Yes to all of that, especially about what a nice guy he is. My faith in humanity has been well and truly shaken the last few years, but people like Chris and Sally, and a host of others, remind me that there a good people out there as well.

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  3. Lloyd Lofthouse

    Here are two suggestions that you may already know about. I subscribe to both of their Blogs and I have bought and read several of Gaughran’s marketing books. Oh, and when you subscribe to Gaughgrans blog, he offers a free book. Both David and Dave offer a lot of great free marketing advice for authors. Geeze, i never notice before that they both have a similar first name, but they aren’t the same person. One is an Irish citizen and the other a US citizen, a nuclear engineer and former US Navy officer.

    https://davidgaughran.com/

    If you’re only interested in David’s blog, just click that link. You may want to also learn who Gaughran is.

    Then there’s Dave Chesson, also known as the kindlepreneur.

    https://kindlepreneur.com/about/

    https://kindlepreneur.com/blog/

    If you haven’t heard of Davie’s Publisher Rocket, you may want to buy the program, load it on your computer and learn how to use it.

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    1. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

      Thanks. I know both, followed them for many years, ultimately unsubscribed because they write for the ‘conventional wisdom’ indie tribe – write lots of books, publish frequently, sell, sell, sell.

      And I take 15 years to write a novel.

      We are not compatible.

      But I do know all the resources they have, and yes, have Rocket.

      Writing mainstream as an indie puts me out in too many left fields to use conventional wisdom, and their stuff requires energetic following.

      I would if I could, but I can’t so I won’t.

      I’m still searching for my method. ‘Going viral’ is too broad, but it’s what I need. Meanwhile, I’m almost finished with Netherworld, and will plunge right into the third book when I get it out.

      I’ve done the obvious, as poorly as I have. ‘Tisn’t me.

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  4. Jack T.

    Good morning, Alicia, and I hope it finds you well. This is the sort of post I might have written, a cry for the old days when everyone could be found on a few platforms, and the blogosphere was easy to manage. I, too, have declined to participate in the myriad of new SM services that seem to multiply like rabbits and belittle you for not changing the way people find you about twice a week.

    I know that you used to read and comment when I was on Blogger, and followed me to WordPress, and I always appreciated your comments. But there came a time when I found my efforts becoming more and more diluted, and I finally just moved everything concerning writing to Writing-dot-com where three-quarters of a million members with a common interest in writing share stories, essays, poetry, anecdotes, and life-lessons, and a good many of us blog. You’re cordially invited to check mine out and poke around the site. You can’t comment unless you’re a member — more on that in a minute — but you’re free to read anything you can find. Now, I have no interest in the site, other than being a member. Membership is free, though there are paid levels to suit every writer’s needs, and unlike Facebook or Twitter, every single person on the site was brought there by an interest in writing, or at least reading good writers. I can tell you that my WdC blog often gets more visits and comments in a single day than my Blogger or WordPress sites got in a month. Suddenly, I’m not shouting in an empty auditorium anymore.

    As to these people who “only read traditionally published and vetted fiction,” screw ’em! You don’t have to, though, they’re screwing themselves. Every traditional publisher is desperate to recreate the money pile that was the Last Big Thing; how many paranormal romances or Lord of the Rings ripoffs can your read, anyway? Indies are out on the cutting edge writing the stories NOW that the so-called Big Five will be crowing about having “discovered” ten years down the road.

    Let me close with a couple of other suggestions that might be to your liking:

    https://theoldshelter.com/
    https://davidleesummers.wordpress.com/
    https://www.cwhawes.com/

    Apologies if you’re already reading these; good stuff tends to get noticed and shared.
    Have a great week!
    ~ Jack

    Like

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    1. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

      Thanks, Jack. I don’t know why I don’t still get your posts, but I’m so glad you stopped by, and I will go sign up for the recommendations.

      I just made a writing.com account, Username Liebja (they wouldn’t let me use my full name). How do I follow you there?

      I don’t read much at any length right now – my speck of energy goes to writing and this kind of communication. But I don’t want to lose any friends – you’re all too valuable.

      Hope you’re enjoying your writing!

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Jack T.

        Thank you, my friend! I don’t think you’ll be sorry. To follow me, return to my blog page and right under the title find Jack of Clubs, my handle there. To the right of it you’ll see a few symbols. One is a + sign. Click on it once and it will turn into a finger. Click it again and it turns into a megaphone. When you see that, you’re following. Once it notifies me, I’ll follow you back, and will make myself available to you to help you navigate the site; it can be a bit tricky. Look in the left sidebar and click on Writing.com 101. That’s your user’s manual, and will answer most questions you might have. Looking forward to reconnecting. Hope you have a great time there!

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        1. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

          Which blog page? Beyondtherails led me to a kitchen faucet ad.

          Should I just use Blimprider on writing.com? That was, btw, the most intrusive registration procedure I have ever endured! I gave them what they wanted, but didn’t have the energy to do more than select ‘writer’.

          Liked by 1 person

    2. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

      Thanks, Jack. I don’t know why I don’t still get your posts, but I’m so glad you stopped by, and I will go sign up for the recommendations.

      I don’t read much at any length right now – my speck of energy goes to writing and this kind of communication. But I don’t want to lose any friends – you’re all too valuable.

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  5. Chris

    New platforms perpetuate mediocrity. Instagram and TikTok are all about short attention spans, inability to read, and being too bored (and frankly, lazy) to reflect.

    YouTube would’ve been great if it wasn’t tuned in a way that promoted publishing often (ergo, more mediocrity; posting a 20-sec “my dog is eating sausages” kind of video every day ranks higher that posting a 30-min lecture on ontology once a month). Still, I’ve found a lot of gems on YouTube. You just have to search for stuff that interest you.

    And, in the end, the same applies to blogs as well. Almost every week I get an email offering me money to post a guest post on Home for Fiction. I tell them, I can’t accept that, but send me your post and if I like it, I’ll publish it for free with any links you want to add. Not once has anyone gotten back to me. This tells me, they know their text is worthless and they’re trying to buy their way out. It also tells me, most stuff we read online might be sponsored this way, which explains the intolerable mediocrity

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

      My illness prevents me from watching videos and listening to audio formats – too much moving and flashing.

      As for offers to publish a guest post – if you mean it, I may take you up on that when Netherworld is ready. I’m not as formal about fiction as you are, but seem to end up on the literary end of most people’s spectra re writing. You would of course have the option of saying it isn’t your thing.

      My main concern now (and it may be cutting my own nose off to spite my face) is there being too many indies writing mainstream/literary/contemporary fiction (NOT Contemporary Romance – that’s a thing, and already well supplied for readers who prefer it), and I will get lost in the tsunami because I am so slow.

      But it is what it is.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    2. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt Post author

      Forgot to say: either the young find their own version of reading, or the human race is doomed. But ‘the young’ is not a homogeneous group – there are always bookworms who take the trouble. They are the underpinning of the future by connecting to the past. There have never been enough of them – it takes SO much reading.

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